FebriDx
Reduce Antibiotic Use
Reduce Antibiotic Use
Accurate (99% NPV)
Accurate (99% NPV)
Lower Healthcare Costs
Lower Healthcare Costs

Viral or Bacterial Infection?

The symptoms can be very similar.

An acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most common single reason for outpatient office visits and antibiotic prescriptions.1-5

More than 90% of patients who present to their healthcare providers with the most common symptom of an ARI—an acute cough—have a syndrome caused by a virus.6-7

Unnecessary use of antibiotics leads to antibiotic resistance, causing more than 25,000 deaths in the EU, and 700,000 globally.8-9 Antibiotic resistance results in costs over €1.5 billion in the EU and $20 billion in the U.S. annually.1-2,8

WHAT IF
THERE WAS A RAPID TEST
TO DIFFERENTIATE A
VIRAL FROM A BACTERIAL
INFECTION?

Introducing FebriDx® Point-of-Care Test Device

The first and only rapid, all-in-one point-of-care test device that can identify a clinically significant acute respiratory infection and differentiate viral from bacterial causes.

FebriDx® can be used to help triage patients at the point of care to reduce uncertainty and avoid unnecessary antibiotics.

Results within 10 minutes increases confidence in whether or not to prescribe an antibiotic.

All-in-one test device allows doctors or nurses to test during triage.

Instrument-free means no expensive equipment and a fully portable solution.

Highly sensitive/specific dual biomarker technology provides reliable differentiation of viral and bacterial infections.

Febridx Cartridge

Acute Respiratory Infections, Antibiotics, and Resistance

An ARI is the most common single reason for outpatient office visits and antibiotic prescriptions.1-5 Up to 80% of all antibiotic prescriptions originate from primary care settings and 60% of those prescriptions are for ARI.1-5
Antibiotic use in the primary care setting is one of the major risk factors for developing antibiotic-resistant organisms and ARI is the most common reason for prescribing antibiotics.10-11 Knowing whether your patient has a virus or bacterial infection could have a direct impact on the spread of resistant bacteria.12
Virus
MORE THAN
90%
OF PATIENTS
WHO PRESENT
WITH AN ACUTE COUGH
HAVE A SYNDROME
CAUSED BY A VIRUS.6-7
bacteria

Antibiotics and Adverse Events

Routine use of antibiotics for ARI should be evaluated for safety as well as efficacy. Up to 1 in 5 drug-related emergency department visits are due to adverse events from antibiotic use, and about 1 in 1,000 has a serious adverse event.1,3,13

Adverse events resulting from unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions increase medical burden, healthcare costs, and expose patients to additional risks.12

When evaluating a patient with ARI symptoms, there is no evidence of benefit from antibiotics for the common cold or acute rhinitis in children or adults. There is evidence that antibiotics cause significant adverse effects in all ages when given for these conditions.14-15

An Example of Antibiotic Overuse: Clostridium difficile

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming bacteria that can produce a toxin causing symptoms ranging from mild diarrhoea to death.16-17 The estimated cost of this infection in Europe is €3 billion per year.18 It is associated with increased mortality and length of stay in hospitalized patients.18 The most important risk factor for C. difficile infection is previous antibiotic use.16-18 By eliminating unnecessary antibiotics and with continued antibiotic stewardship efforts, C. difficile rates can be reduced.16-17

Antibiotic Adverse Events15

COMMON
LESS COMMON
ALLERGIES (IMMEDIATE OR DELAYED)

COMMON

DIARRHOEA

NAUSEA

VOMITING

RASH

UPSET STOMACH

FUNGAL/YEAST INFECTIONS

C. difficile INFECTIONS

LESS COMMON

KIDNEY STONES

ABNORMAL BLOOD CLOTTING

SUN SENSITIVITY

BLOOD DISORDERS

DEAFNESS

SEVERE BLOODY DIARRHOEA

ALLERGIES (IMMEDIATE OR DELAYED)

RASH

SWELLING OF THE TONGUE

SWELLING OF THE FACE

DIFFICULTY BREATHING

FebriDx® Can Help Your Practice and Your Patients

Practice efficiency and improved workflow

Time management is important for you and for your patients. FebriDx® can assist with a diagnosis within 10 minutes for patients with ARIs. The FebriDx® test is easily performed by a nurse or healthcare worker—either at the point of triage or after—
freeing up valuable physician time. FebriDx® can accurately determine whether your patient needs antibiotics within a single clinic visit.
Workflow

IN A 10,000 PATIENT PRACTICE, USING FEBRIDX® SAVES DOCTORS ~ 43 DAYS ANNUALLY.19

Patient satisfaction

Patients often insist on antibiotics. Since most coughs are caused by viral infections, antibiotics can often be prescribed unnecessarily.6-7 Using FebriDx® can help you explain why your patient may or may not need antibiotics, thereby improving patient satisfaction and confidence in their treatment recommendations.

Within 10 Minutes
YOU MAY HAVE
JUST A FEW MINUTES
WITH EACH PATIENT.20
Medical Professional

HOW DO YOU KNOW
IF THEY NEED ANTIBIOTICS?

FEBRIDX® CAN PROVIDE HIGHLY ACCURATE RESULTS WITHIN THAT TIME PERIOD.

FebriDx
GIVE YOUR PATIENTS THE ANSWERS AND EDUCATION THEY NEED DURING THEIR APPOINTMENT.

1. Harris AM, Hicks LA, Qaseem A. Appropriate antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infection in adults. Ann Intern Med. 2016;165(9):674.
2. O’Conner R, O’Doherty J, O’Regan A, et al. Antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in primary care; what factors affect prescribing and why is it important? A narrative review. Ir J Med Sci. 2018;187:969-86.
3. Dekker ARJ, Verheij TJM, van der Velden AW. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription for respiratory tract indications: most prominent in adult patients. Fam Pract. 2015;32:401-7.
4. Shallcross L, Beckley N, Rait G, et al. Antibiotic prescribing frequency amongst patients in primary care: a cohort study using electronic health records. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2017;72:1818-24.
5. Gulliford MC, Dregan A, Moore MV, et al. Continued high rates of antibiotic prescribing to adults with respiratory tract infection: survey of 568 UK general practices. BMJ Open. 2014;4:e006245.
6. Bisno AL. Acute pharyngitis: etiology and diagnosis. Pediatrics. 1996;97(6 pt 2):949-54.
7. Strauss RA. Treatment of postviral nonasthmatic cough with corticosteroids. J Allergy Clin Immunol: In Practice. 2013;1:404-6.
8. EU action on antimicrobial resistance. https://ec.europa.eu/health/amr/antimicrobial-resistance_en. Accessed 2019 May 6.
9. Machowska A, Lundborg CS. Drivers of irrational use of antibiotics in Europe. Int J Environ Res Pub Health. 2019;16(27).
10. Goossens H, Ferech M, Vander Stichele R, et al. ESAC Project Group. Outpatient antibiotic use in Europe and association with resistance: a cross-national database study. Lancet. 2005;357:579-87.
11. Costelloe C, Metcalfe C, Lovering A, et al. Effect of antibiotic prescribing in primary care on antimicrobial resistance in individual patients: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2010;340:c2096.
12. Barnes MN, Cleveland C, Williams L. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections. U.S. Pharm. 2016;41(7):HS16-9.
13. Rattinger GB, Mullins CD, Zuckerman IH, et al. A sustainable strategy to prevent misuse of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections. PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e51147.
14. Kenealy T, Arroll B. Antibiotics for the common cold and acute purulent rhinitis. Cochrane Data System Rev. 2013;6:CD000247.
15. Nordqvist C, Carter A. What to know about antibiotics. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/10278.php. Published January 2019. Accessed 2019 July 29.
16. Krutova M, Kinross P, Barbut F, et al. How to: Surveillance of Clostridium difficile infections. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2018;24(5):469-75.
17. Durovic A, Widmer AF, Tschudin-Sutter S. New insights into transmission of Clostridium difficile infection—narrative review. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2018;24(5):483-92.
18. Asensio A, Di Bella S, Lo Vecchio A, et al. The impact of Clostridium difficile infection on resource use and costs in hospitals in Spain and Italy: a matched cohort study. Int J Infect Dis. 2015;36:31-8.
19. Lumos Diagnostics internal data, 2019.
20. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/11/08/gp-consultations-britain-among-shortest-europe/. Accessed 2019 March 26.